Commemorative plates

Evil often dominates, but never wins

Evil often dominates, but never wins

Each week Royal Delft publishes a blog inspired by the many memorial plates that have been created by De Koninklijke Porceleyne Fles over the years. The theme of the blogs is Faith, Hope & Resilience. To commemorate earlier times-, and to be able to draw strength from the situation in which we find ourselves now.

Today we have written about: Evil often dominates, but never wins.

Source: Centraal Museum

The Delft Blue plate was painted following the Hungarian uprising in 1956. The Hungarian uprising was massive and lasted from October 23 to November 10, 1956. The rebellion arose spontaneously and was directed against the Stalinist regime in the Republic of Hungary.*

Employees of De Koninklijke Porceleyne Fles were distrained by the international developments. They wanted to create a commemorative plate that offered a hopeful perspective. The message of the memorial plate also applies to our current circumstances.

The worldwide impact of Covid-19 is indescribable. But where we first panicked - evil often  dominates – the reality is now sinking in. We’re allin this together, we’re all looking towards the future and we are taking our responsibilities very seriously: but never wins.

On the Delft Blue commemorative plate you see a tree rising from evil ground. L. van Stein is the creator of this special plate.

* Source: Wikipedia)

The Netherlands will rise again II

The Netherlands will rise again II

Each week Royal Delft publishes a blog inspired by the many memorial plates that have been created by De Koninklijke Porceleyne Fles over the years. The theme of the blogs is Faith, Hop & Resilience. To commemorate earlier times-, and to be able to draw strength from the situation in which we find ourselves now.

Around Liberation Day 1945, a number of commemorative plates were made which we would like to highlight in this series. Today we have written about: The Netherlands will rise again II.

This commemorative plate has a complex border of different flowers in different shades of blue. The freedom pigeons in the middle of the plate fly around the Orange apples with a floral wreath made of tulips in their mouth.

Contrary to popular belief, the Orange apples are not apples, but oranges. These used to be called orange apples. The name orange apple is also related to the southern French city of Orange, the former capital of the County of Orange and centuries of hereditary possession of the Nassaus, later the Orange-Nassaus. The city was a center of food trade, including oranges. *

On this plate, orange paint has been used, just like the first plate from the blog series. The orange paint that has been used is only used for special commemorative plates and Orange Ceramics. The text is the same as the first plate we discussed in the blog: 'The Netherlands will rise again'. It is a much heard quote after the Second World War, but is also applicable on the situation we are in today. It is a difficult time, but as a country we’ll get through this together.

* source: Wikipedia

Commemorative plate 'Holland rises again. KLM is leading the way'

Commemorative plate 'Holland rises again. KLM is leading the way'

Royal Delft publishes a weekly blog inspired by the many memorial boards that have been created by Koninklijke Porceleyne Fles over the years. The theme of the blogs is Faith, Hope & Resilience. To commemorate earlier, and to be able to draw strength from the situation in which we find ourselves now.

Today the commemorative tile: Holland rises again, KLM is leading the way.

Worldwide we see that Covid-19 has a huge impact on the economy. Tourism is being hit hard and many airlines are having a hard time. Airplanes are on the ground and the airspace is locked.

The tile is a Cloisonné tile from the series 'Nederland Herrijst' and was designed by H.J. Tieman (1921) on the occasion of the first flight from KLM to New York in 1946. It was a happy moment, which confirmed to the residents of the Netherlands that the Netherlands was in an upward spiral.

Cloisonne tiles made their appearance during the Second World War. The technique arose out of necessity because De Porceleyne Fles had to use the clay from the region. It was impossible for De Porcelyne Fles to import the usual clay. The clay used for the Cloisonné technique is greyish, so that it was impossible to make beautiful blue / white pottery.

Cloisonné is a technique of enamelling, in which crushed wire is attached to a metal surface in certain motifs or figures. The gaps between the pieces of wire are covered with different colors of enamel powder. The crushed thread prevents the colors from blending into each other during the heating of the enamel. The tile in the brown - green decor shows an Amsterdam canal with the Westertoren, with the New York skyline in white behind it and a DC 3 from KLM.

As Royal Delft, we look forward to receive many (inter) national guests who have come to us via the various airlines one day. We hope to let you enjoy the beautiful world of Delft Blue and the history of our beautiful brand again soon. Today we do that as much as possible online, but the day will come when our doors will be wide open for you again.

The Netherlands will rise again

Commemorative plate 'The Netherlands will rise again'

The Netherlands is a strong country. A country with a vision and a country with inhabitants who help each other. A country we are proud of. This year the Netherlands has been liberated for 75 years. The current circumstances limit us in celebrating such a happy event. Nevertheless, we would like to dwell on 75 years of freedom and the resilience that Dutch society has shown.

As of today, Royal Delft will publish a weekly blog inspired by the many commemorative plates that have been created by the Koninklijke Porceleyne Fles over the years. The theme of the blogs is Faith, Hope & Resilience: to commemorate the past and to be able to draw strength from the difficult situation we are in today.

This week we have written about the commemorative plate "The Netherlands will rise again".

“It is noteworthy that the sale and therefore also the production of Delft Blue remained at a satisfactory level throughout the war. This can be explained, because the supply of luxury items from abroad was cut off almost entirely. On the other hand, however, household budgets were increasingly taxed by the sharply rising prices of basic necessities. It even happened during the hunger winter 1944-1945, when the train and postal connections were disrupted, that people sometimes reached the factory from a considerable distance, to buy some things or to place orders for later delivery. ” (J.G. Adriani - Memories and Experiences from My Years of Service July 1911 - May 1955).

Mr. Adriani describes the progress of the activities during the Second World War at Royal Delft. These were difficult and uncertain times for Delft Blue. There was no confidence, hardly any communication and the supply of the necessary resources was delayed. De Porceleyne Fles faced major challenges, but was able to adapt the service to the ever-changing circumstances. After all, it wasn't the first challenge the company faced, as it had already been in production for nearly 300 years.

Even now, during the Corona virus, Royal Delft is adapting its services to the current situation. Yes, we are facing a tough challenge, but we still show our resilience. We want to pass on our love for Delft Blue to the younger generation, including the free online children's tour through the museum.

This Delft Blue commemorative plate, painted in 1945 by J. Marijnissen, makes us realize that this time will soon be behind us. The orange rays of the sun above the typical Dutch landscape symbolize the resurgence. These were very difficult times in May 1945. The sign shows that people kept their eyes on the future and believed in reconstruction. The orange paint used in the board is only used for special commemorative plates and Orange Ceramics.

Even now, in these times of the Corona virus, we believe in the strength of the Netherlands. We look forward and to the future.